The Group Dentistry Now Show: The Voice Of The DSO Industry – Episode 65

Dr. Greg White joins the podcast. He serves as the president and CEO of PepperPointe Partnerships, which currently serves more than 90 pediatric dental, orthodontic and general dentistry locations and more than 100 doctors. He discusses the traditional DSO model versus their alternative DSO model and the primary attributes of their model that were convincing enough to have 20 practices come together on the same day, and then another 37 practices come together on the same day nearly one year later.

Contact Dr. Greg White at [email protected] to find out more.

If you like our podcast, please give us a ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ review on iTunes http://apple.co/2Nejsfa and a Thumbs Up on YouTube.

Our podcast series brings you dental support and emerging dental group practice analysis, conversation, trends, news and events. Listen to leaders in the DSO and emerging dental group space talk about their challenges, successes, and the future of group dentistry. The Group Dentistry Now Show: The Voice of the DSO Industry has listeners across North & South America, Australia, Europe, and Asia. If you like our show, tell a friend or a colleague.

Choose your favorite listening app below and subscribe today so you don’t miss an episode! Full transcript is also provided below. 

Full Transcript:

Bill Neumann:

Hi, I’d like to welcome everyone to The Group Dentistry Now Show, I’m Bill Neumann, and as always thank you everybody for listening in today, whether it’s on Spotify, Apple, Google, or any of the other audio platforms that we’re on. Without a great audience like you, we wouldn’t have a show and of course, without great guests, you wouldn’t be listening, so without further ado, I’d like to introduce you to a really exciting guest that we have on the show today, Dr. Greg White, who is the president and CEO of PepperPointe Partnerships. Thanks Greg for being here today.

Dr. Greg White:

It’s my pleasure Bill. Thank you.

Bill Neumann:

Yeah, this is going to be an exciting conversation. I love to talk about some of the interesting things that are really going on in the group practice in the DSO space, but you’ve got to really beyond being an accomplished orthodontist that has a alternative DSO platform. You have done a lot of entrepreneurial things outside of the dental industry, so if you wouldn’t mind talking a little bit about that. I’m maybe putting you on the spot here, but you’ve just done so many cool things. It’s really neat to just talk about some of those things outside of the dental industry.

Dr. Greg White:

Yeah. Well, I appreciate that Bill. Yeah, I guess early on in my orthodontic career, I had a tendency to wander outside of that a little bit and kind of explore some other things. When you’re young, you tend to do that. You have the energy and passion for it, then it’s a great little outlet. My first foray into business outside of orthodontics was probably three to four years into my career. I was I guess, about 31, 32 and got into the restaurant business as a franchisee to begin with. And then over a period of several years, ended up owning 17 restaurants, 10 of which were franchises. And the other seven were three different concepts that I came up with and put those into place.

Dr. Greg White:

And so that was real interesting and it was a great little pathway because in dentistry it’s quite easy to have a profitable business, even though it may not be a great business, it can still be profitable because the margins are so good or certainly were back then. But when you’re in a restaurant business where you’re dealing with single digit margins, you really have to hone your skills on being able to manage things such as food, and labor, and paper cost, and that sort of thing. That was really a great exercise for me to go through over about a 23 year period that I had owned those restaurants, to really hone those skills. And then somewhere along the way, my original orthodontic partner, his wife was diagnosed with breast cancer and he created a silicone foam and he patented it, as a use for a prosthetic for women who had undergone mastectomy.

Dr. Greg White:

And so he asked me if I could help him turn that into a company, so we did that and raised enough money to be able to launch it. And then we ended up selling that three to four years later to a company out of Ireland. And still today, that product remains the number one seller of custom breast prosthesis worldwide. And so anyway, a few things like that I’ve done along the way that really actually helped me as I was beginning to look at an alternative DSO that ultimately became PepperPointe.

Bill Neumann:

Really, really cool. And your point is well taken on the restaurant side of things, as far as the margins and really kind of creating a customer experience that I think a lot of DSOs are doing, some with more success than others, but you talked a little bit about the high margins in dentistry and being able to, even without having maybe the best business plan out there still do pretty well for yourself. Certainly not the case in retail and in the restaurant business, so kind of in interesting how that… I’m sure that’s really helped you with PepperPointe. A little bit of background on Greg on the dental side of things now, so obviously he’s a DMD orthodontist, was one of the founding partners of White, Greer &-

Dr. Greg White:

Maggard-

Bill Neumann:

Orthodontics which is formed back in 1991. And is currently one of the largest privately owned orthodontic group practices in the country. Greg, you practiced orthodontics for a little more than 25 years, right?

Dr. Greg White:

Yeah. I practiced full-time for 28 years, and then the last two, I had to pull out of the clinic in order to devote my full time to the management of PepperPointe.

Bill Neumann:

Let’s talk about PepperPointe Partnerships, talk a little bit about what led to its formation back in 2017.

Dr. Greg White:

Yeah, so PepperPointe, Bill, was really formed as a company to execute a business model that really was aimed at minimizing the disruptions that were facing the orthodontist and the pediatric dentist within a defined geographic area. And the whole idea was that if we could self-consolidate, rather than each individual practice selling their practices piecemeal to private equity backed DSOs, that we could keep the ownership in the offices, have the practitioners own their own DSO, and therefore be able to negotiate with third party payers, be able to negotiate with suppliers. Basically have this same advantages that the DSO backed practices have, but without giving up what we consider the heart and soul of the practice, which is the doctor ownership, it’s that heart and soul that causes that doctor to stay committed to take those calls at all hours of the night, to invest in the community, to become a community leader, and to stay for 25 and 30 years as a practitioner really committing themselves to the patients as well.

Dr. Greg White:

That’s what we were trying to preserve is what we had created and our legacy. And then along with that, creating a pathway to ownership for the new doctors, so that we could reconstitute the old transition model that has largely died as a result of the high student loan debt that kids get out of school with coupled with the inability to purchase practices that are for sale because of the inability to obtain loans due to the ever increasing restrictions from lenders. And then also, the high price of those practices as a result of the valuation changes with PE entering the dental field.

Bill Neumann:

Yeah. A lot of different variables make it really almost insurmountable for a young dentist to try and acquire a practice. Whether it’s the student debt, or the valuations, to your point that we’re a PE or a strategic partner, a large DSO can come in and offer quite a bit more money for a practice than a solo practitioner would be able to afford.

Dr. Greg White:

Exactly.

Bill Neumann:

But beyond that, so it makes a lot of sense, you’ve got this alternative DSO model out there. Tell me a little bit about the why behind it. I mean, you gave me some reasons. I mean, did you go out into the market, were you talking to docs in your community that said, Hey, this sounded like a great idea. How did you vet the model?

Dr. Greg White:

Well, the first thing that I did is I had to explore what was out there, so at that time Bill, we consisted of 20 orthodontic only locations, all within a 60 mile radius of Lexington, Kentucky. I was the managing partner of that practice. And as a result of that, I had a responsibility to my partners in order to start looking for an exit strategy. What does it look like? The practice had grown to a point where it was going to be very difficult for any group of individuals to purchase it because of the things I just laid out, the valuation changes, so I had to do what was right by my partners from a financial standpoint, but I also felt a moral obligation to do what was right for the patients, so I started exploring the various DSO options out there and despite cultural differences, they all really came down to the same thing.

Dr. Greg White:

And that was that they were going to give us a big cheque, they were going to greatly reduce our incomes, and they were going to give us some stock. And then we were going to need to say really nice things about what we had done and build a strong case for why we made that decision, because we need to say positive things to other practitioners so that they would do the same thing, so that my stock would rise, so that I could sell it three to five years later when that private equity company rolled it up to a larger tier PE company, that then would become the owner of the DSO. But ultimately I was going to take a big cheque, and my income was going to decrease significantly, and the terms and the timing of my exit from dentistry was largely going away. It was going to be out of my hands rather.

Dr. Greg White:

I started looking at that and I said, well, I don’t know that, that’s what most orthodontists to pediatric dentists or general dentists for that matter really want. Are they looking at the age of 45 or 50 to go ahead and exit within the next three years? Do they really want to take this big income hit? Do they need this big cheque? And I could understand it if it was somebody who was fairly new out of school that had a nice practice, but had this unbearable debt load that was weighing on their minds, and they wanted to get out from under it. Good alternative for them to go with a traditional DSO or the really old and tired person that just can’t do this anymore. I just want out tomorrow, but that really wasn’t 80% of the folks that I talked to, what they really wanted was protection from the disruptions.

Dr. Greg White:

They wanted to stop this death by a thousand paper cuts, from reimbursements being lower from rising cost of technology, equipment, supplies, just getting eaten away a little bit at a time. I went to my orthodontic partners, and I went to some of the other orthodontists in the community, and some of the other pediatric dentists. And I said, do you really need a big chunk of money right in now? And they said, no, I just really want these protections. I said, okay, well why don’t we create a model whereby we don’t get any money up front, our income doesn’t go down, but rather goes up because of the negotiation with the third party payers, decrease supply cost. We can then purchase other practices for people who want to sell out around the area.

Dr. Greg White:

And then we have an exit strategy built in so that we sell back to the company, and then what we sell is a pathway to ownership for the associate doctors that work for us. But since we’re doing this under the formation and under the structure of our own DSO, when we retire, we don’t have to sell our ownership in our DSO, we can keep that, and that becomes our passive income in retirement. And that really answered an age old question that most, every dentist has asked at some point in their career. How can I maintain my lifestyle once I retire? And this answered that question, so it provided all of those things, the protection, the increased income, the exit, the legacy extension, and the passive income in retirement.

Bill Neumann:

Really interesting there, so let me try and understand this and the audience understands it, right? And from a transition standpoint, a dentist that’s looking to retire would be able to sell out there or bring in an associate or somebody new to that practice to kind of sell that to this new dentist at the practice level, but still retain equity in the topco, in the DSO.

Dr. Greg White:

Yeah, so sort of. What they’re actually doing is selling their interest in the overall group, because when we all came in and merged back in August of 2019, and that was 50 locations all on the same day, 20 different practices, we all conveyed our ownership into that group practice. And in return for conveying our ownership into that practice, we all received a percentage ownership in the DSO, and in the group practice, which the stock in that tied us all back to our original income when we were coming in. That income has continued to increase year over year, over the last two years because of those negotiations that I mentioned along with just purchasing other practices in the area that did not take part in this initial consolidation.

Dr. Greg White:

When a partner decides they want to retire, they sell their ownership not to an individual coming in, but rather back to company. That company, while it has maybe 40 different partner docs, it also has 15 or 20 associate doctors. The next associate doctor in line, as determined by that ownership group of doctors is the one that gets the opportunity to purchase that stock, thereby benefiting from the retained earning in the practice. The person that replaces them in their office becomes an associate doctor that then gets in line for that pathway to ownership as well, so who is receiving that retiring doctor’s ownership is not necessarily going to be the individual that replaces them in that office, but rather the next associate doctor in line for pathway to ownership.

Bill Neumann:

Okay, great. Yeah, that clears things up. That makes a lot of sense. Quick question for you here. I mean, obviously a pretty new model. I mean, coming up with this idea seems really unique in the space, so was there any concern that this might not work?

Dr. Greg White:

Well yeah, absolutely. I mean, whenever you’re doing something different, you always are concerned that it’s not going to work, so you have to build protections within the model to make sure that each of the practitioners coming in are making one commitment and they live up to that commitment. And that is that I’ll continue to work at the same rate that I am right now. And if I do that, I know that my income’s going to come up, so you have to build protections in to make sure that you don’t get the person that comes in and lays down. This is not a retirement plan for now, this is a consolidation of all of the superstars within a geographic area who have great practices, who love what they want to do, who want to continue to do it for a while. A while means that they commit to doing this for three more years or longer, so if they want out within three years, then probably go ahead, take the money and move on.

Dr. Greg White:

If you don’t mind someone else determining what happens to your staff, and what happens to your practice, and what happens to your patients. That’s just a choice that each individual has to make. And believe me, that is an easy one to make for somebody in that situation. We’ve seen it happen in medicine and pharmacy over the years. It’s what I call JRC, justify, rationalize and compromise. I’ve got to do this, I got to take the money, because it’s in the best interest of my family. And then you go and buy condo in Vero Beach or whatever’s best for your family. But it’s also what has led to the situation that we have in medicine now as compared to what it used to look like. Medicine used to look very similar to what dentistry does now. You went and picked out the dentist or the physician back then through the yellow pages, they were all over every corner in town.

Dr. Greg White:

And you just ask your friend, Hey, do you like Dr. Borders over here? Yeah, he is great. And call and made an appointment. Now you don’t do that. You pick an insurance company, insurance company picks a hospital, hospital picks your doctors, and same with pharmacy. You used to know who your pharmacist was. You could call them up, they’d meet you at the local drug store in the evening. Now you have no idea, you have to go through a phone tree at Walgreens, or Rite Aids, or whatever, to get to whoever the pharmacist on duty is. I just didn’t spend 30 years of my life building something that I care so deeply about to just turn it over for a check. I just consider that… for me, it was just a negotiated terms of surrender to do that. If I wasn’t going to be able to determine what was going to happen with my patients, with my practice, and with my staff, then I couldn’t live with that.

Bill Neumann:

Let’s talk a little bit about, you mentioned it earlier, you said that initially you had 20 practices come together on the same day, to become part of this new model. And then I think it was a year later there was another 37 practices that came together again. Talk a little bit about the motivating factors there and just really interesting, that’s a big number 20 practices at once.

Dr. Greg White:

Yeah. That’s what happened initially after I had those conversations, and keep in mind that all 92 of those locations, so the 20 practices and the 37 practices are 57 different brands. They still function under those brand names, same people, same locations, everything’s exactly the same, same hours of operation. The public never even knew that this occurred because nothing changed. We basically stabilized the status quo, how it is now, what we did represented the least amount of change possible for each of those practices, including doing nothing at all. We built a wall of protection around ourselves to really prevent any DSO from gaining any traction in our market, because of that tight density, we were able to create the negotiating power in order to increase the profitability by millions of dollars in the first year. As far as I know, we were the only practice of any type where each of the partner doctors had their highest income year individually in 2020 as compared to any other previous year, even with not withstanding COVID.

Dr. Greg White:

That was so successful in the early days of it, that I started getting a lot of phone calls from the general dentists in the area. Enough so that I had a meeting with them, shared with them what we had done. They asked if we could do the same for them. And when I say, could we do the same, PepperPointe which had really started out as nothing more than a location, the back office support company for my original 20 orthodontic practices. Now, all of a sudden is a DSO owned by 37 different doctors, the original partners within White, Greer & Maggard plus all of those other 15 practices, constituting the total 50 offices on [Ortho and Peto 00:20:27] that all came together on that day in August of 19. PepperPointe then at that point set up the exact same thing for the general dentists, 37 different practices, 42 offices, 47 practice owners.

Dr. Greg White:

And on October 1st of 2020, they formed their own independent company that had all of the same advantages, meaning no money changed hands whatsoever, the income stayed the same and has increased since that date by about 12% over the previous year. And they have the exact same structure where they receive the passive income in retirement. They have the stock that they sell back to the overall company, which passes that ownership to the next generation of dentists, allowing them to live out their hopes and dreams, just like our generation did. And so yeah, over a 14 month period, those two companies formed managed by PepperPointe not owned by PepperPointe. PepperPointe simply facilitated the consolidation within this geographic area, all within 70 miles of Lexington, Kentucky.

Dr. Greg White:

Those two companies constituting 93 total offices, so at that point it was important that we learned from what we did well, learned from what we didn’t do well internally, go back and refine all of those systems within PepperPointe from revenue cycle management to how we manage employee benefit, to how bills come in, how payments posted, all of those things, how our procurement is done, renegotiated purchasing agreements at that time, renegotiated agreements with third party payers in order to really position ourselves well to go into other markets, should there be other people that want to fight for their own backyard through this consolidation model as an alternative to here’s your check, here’s your new income, and here’s your stock certificates.

Bill Neumann:

You mentioned the original 20 and then 37, and I think you mentioned that they were pediatric and or orthodontic practices, but you have some GPs as well, right?

Dr. Greg White:

Yeah, so the original consolidation was GP, I’m sorry, was Peto and Ortho, that was the 20 different practices, 50 total locations. 20 of those of which were the original White, Greer & Maggard Orthodontic offices. The second consolidation, which was a separate consolidation, 14 months later was all GP, 37 practices, 42 locations.

Bill Neumann:

Okay, gotcha. All right. Let’s talk a little bit about the type of dentist or the type of group that this model would appeal to?

Dr. Greg White:

Well, I think it really does appeal to that orthodontist pediatric dentist, that enjoys what they do, enjoys what they’re doing right now, but wants true ownership. I’m not talking about true autonomy. There is a big difference in autonomy and ownership. When you talk about autonomy, most DSOs are talking about, you have autonomy in making treatment decisions for a patient in the chair. What they don’t talk about is the autonomy that occurs outside the chair, who you get your supplies from? Who works for you? How much do they get paid? Talking about the business side of things, that is where the autonomy stops generally in most of the DSOs that I’ve looked at, how systems are put in place, that sort of thing. What we wanted to do was protect what we had, so all of those doctors that came in, those partner doctors in each of those two consolidations, they have board positions on not just the clinical boards, I’m talking about the boards that makes the decisions. PepperPointe simply does the legwork, determines what options are, presents pros and cons to that board.

Dr. Greg White:

And that board of dentists makes the decisions about the business and where it goes forward, so that’s a key component, a key difference. In ours, they don’t work for PepperPointe, they work for themselves, they work for their group practice. They get to determine when they retire, they cannot get fired without cause, they cannot be replaced by somebody that gets paid less money. These folks are all making more money than they were made making when they were on their own. And the reason we can do that is because we don’t have debt, because we didn’t pay anybody anything, nor did we receive anything as White, Greer & Maggard partners when this consolidated. That money that these folks get paid in the traditional DSOs, that money comes from a private equity fund, generally funded by either wealthy families or in most cases institutional investors.

Dr. Greg White:

And there is an expectation of a 30% return in that. Well, how in the world, can you pay a 30% return to the investors if you don’t take that away from the dentist? And in fact, you do take that away from the dentist and you take that away in terms of their compensation. That’s what they’re getting paid for, a multiple on the difference of what they used to make versus what they’re going to make, so this model appeals to the people that aren’t really interested in going to an associate level income after they’ve been receiving partner level income for 15, 20, 25 or 30 years.

Bill Neumann:

Yep. Great, great points. Let’s talk a little bit about this, earlier in the conversation you had mentioned geographically that your practices, the PepperPointe Partnership practices were 70 miles from like the center being Lexington’s Kentucky. Is that about right?

Dr. Greg White:

That is correct.

Bill Neumann:

Okay, so let’s talk about your vision for the future of PepperPointe, so what does that look like? Does it look like expansion from there? Or what are your thoughts?

Dr. Greg White:

The original intent of this Bill, was really just to protect our own backyard, protect what we liked and what we love to do for a living, and to make sure that we were continuing to get compensated for that. To be able to prepare for the competition that inevitably comes into the market by way of consolidation through private equity backed DSO model, it’s going to affect everyone unless self-consolidation is done. After we did this, I wanted to make sure that the concept was proven. And so we’ve had two years of one and almost one year of the other, it’s working out exactly the way that we had drawn it up. And so at that point I decided, well, you know what? I might as well go ahead and share this with other folks to see if this resonates. And so I spoke at the Dykema conference out in Denver last month, about six weeks ago. And it has absolutely resonated with folks. And so we’ve had calls from a lot of folks, in a lot of different places throughout the country, wanting to hear more about it.

Dr. Greg White:

We are sharing that with them, both in person and virtually. And so what we will do is help execute the consolidation within the markets of folks that want to protect what they’ve built, that are like-minded with us, and that want to create this self-consolidation. And then the PepperPointe platform would be utilized in order to manage all of the back office functions, so in that regard, we are very similar to every other DSO, in the services that we provide. We provide a very high level of services, as you can imagine when these original partners or people that I worked with for 25 and 30 years, I make sure that they’re served extremely well in all of those areas, HR, operations, finance, marketing. And so we have gotten very good at that, so now the idea is, let’s do that same thing to take away the night job from folks in other markets that want to self-consolidate, execute the formation of the company for them, and then help them create the efficiencies as they identify to us what would be the best version of themselves.

Dr. Greg White:

Remember they keep their identity. That’s important. They built themselves based upon their brand, they keep that brand. We simply want to help them do all of the things that they always wanted to do in those staff meetings. When they would get together and say we need to do this, and this, and this. And then after the staff meeting, everybody went back to their desk because there was nobody to execute those plans. That’s what we helped them do, become the best version of themselves. And as we do that, that does two things. It greatly enhances the patient experience. And then it creates increased profitability as a result of helping them identify, document, and execute really efficient processes within their offices, as they want them done. We don’t impose them, we simply help them if they want to become a better version of themselves, as they define that.

Bill Neumann:

So after the Dykema meeting and people started to hear about this model that you’ve created, you’ve been talking I guess, over different parts of the country. Like-minded groups or practitioners that might want to replicate something in their geography and leverage PepperPointe’s model?

Dr. Greg White:

That’s exactly right. And what I’m finding is there are a lot more people that are like minded than I had anticipated. What they’re telling me Bill, is we didn’t know if there was anything out there like this. We thought we were going to have to sell our practices, take advantage of the high multiples now out of the fear of missing out, but we really don’t want to take a cut in income, we don’t want to retire in three to five years, or we don’t want to work three to five years from now after we sell our stock for a greatly reduced income, we just want protection. And so I’ve spent most of my time in airplanes, flying into various markets right now explaining this.

Dr. Greg White:

We have not reached out to anyone ourselves these are all inbound calls that we are simply responding to. And just identifying, Hey, who really wants to do this. And letting them know you really don’t have to do anything. All you have to do is be able to invite somebody to dinner to hear about it, and we’ll show up and we’ll explain this. And that has been extremely fruitful in doing so. And I’m finding that there are a lot of people that are energized by what we’re talking about, and our story, and what we can show them that we have done here, and what they could do for themselves in their market.

Bill Neumann:

Before I forget this, Greg, what is your email address or an email address that they can contact if any of our listeners or the readers of Group Dentistry Now want to find out more and have you sit down, and talk to them about this in more detail.

Dr. Greg White:

Yes. They can reach me directly at gwhite, so that’s G as in Greg, White like the color, @pepperpointe.com, so that’s P-E-P-P-E-R-P-O-I-N-T-E, so there’s an E on point, on PepperPointe and that’s all one word and it’s .com.

Bill Neumann:

Excellent. That’s great. And we’ll make sure we have that email address in the show notes, and we’ll transcribe this entire conversation, so the email address will be there as well. Okay, final question for you. You’re doing something pretty unique in the industry and very unique in the DSO space, so based on what you’re doing, and then what other DSO models look like, and where the industry is headed. What do you think the future of dentistry looks like if we look out, I don’t know, let’s go five, 10 years out. What would you see the landscape look like?

Dr. Greg White:

Well, I certainly think that consolidation is going to continue to occur. It will be a nearly complete consolidation over the next 10 years in areas that are deemed desirable to live as defined by the new graduates, so I think the DSOs are paying careful attention to where the graduating dental students want to live. That’s where they’re going in and consolidating these markets through the traditional DSO model, or in some cases that’s where self consolidation will take place, if what we have done resonates with folks. The places that will be untouched largely will be the rural areas that are three hours away from the nearest airport, one hour away from the nearest interstate. The problem with that is those individuals that have highly profitable practices in those areas are going to find it difficult to find people to come in and live in those areas to replace them, so they have something of very high value that is going to be very difficult to sell for that reason.

Dr. Greg White:

The consolidation is going to occur, as that occurs it’s going to create limited options for the graduating dentists for ownership. It’s going to put a ceiling on their level of income because they’re not going to have ownership in it. It is going to likely result in the continued 30 to 35% turnover rate of doctors that currently exist within the DSO space. And I think that is not going to bode well for continuity of care for the patients ultimately. What we try to do is just offer something a little bit different. Obviously it has resonated. If you can imagine how compelling a model would have to be to entice 38 partners, 20 different individual practices to all consolidate on the same day without receiving any money. And then one year later, 47 of them, in 37 different practices consolidating all on one day without receiving one dime.

Dr. Greg White:

The details that I can’t possibly get into here today, are compelling enough to have made that happen twice. And it’s resonating with dozens of other places throughout the country, so consolidation will occur. It is up to the practitioners to decide what that consolidation would look like. Will it look like what medicine looked like? Will everyone sell to the large corporations and will dentistry as medicine is today all be owned by hospitals and corporations? Will dentistry be owned by corporations backed and owned by people who have never sat in a dental chair. It will ultimately be up to the dentists just as it was up to the physicians back then consolidation outside of doctor ownership cannot take place without complicity of the healthcare professionals themselves.

Bill Neumann:

That’s a great way to sum things up, and exciting times for the industry, and certainly exciting times for you, Dr. White. I’m really intrigued by the model and I’m excited for the future of the industry, and the future for the clinicians in particular, and ultimately the patients.

Dr. Greg White:

Yes, I would just say to the dentists, that the future of dentistry is 100% and completely within your hands, for now.

Bill Neumann:

That is a great way to finish things off. Again, we will have Greg’s email address if you want to reach out to him. Dr. White, I really appreciate you taking time today. Thanks for educating The Group Dentistry Now audience, this is a really intriguing motto. We’ll be following it, and we’ll hope to have you back next year. Maybe we can talk about the next group that you’ve worked with and where in the country that may be.

Dr. Greg White:

Okay, I would appreciate the opportunity. And I really thank you for having me on today, Bill.

Bill Neumann:

That sounds good. Again, that was Dr. Greg White, who is the president and CEO of PepperPointe Partnerships. We’ll have his contact information in the show notes. And thanks again, everybody for listening in today. This is Bill Neumann for The Group Dentistry Now Show.

 

Facebooktwitterlinkedin